To become a fully qualified electrician, you will spend two to four years, on average, learning in a classroom setting and training in practical skills as an apprentice. You will also be tested on all of these skills in order to receive your National Vocational Qualification. But what exactly will you be learning?

There are many colleges and training centres you can enroll at to take the necessary courses to earn your diplomas and qualification and the courses are generally the same. The training requirements are the same across the board and are established by the Sector Skills Council, Summit Skills to ensure uniformity in training and qualifying.

The general course work is as follows:

  • Understanding the procedures and practices for organizing the work environment (Installation)
  • Understanding environmental regulations, principles, and working practices of technology systems
  • Understanding the principles of selection and planning for the installation of electrical equipment and its systems in buildings and structures
  • Understanding Health and Safety regulations, practices, and procedures (Installation and Maintenance of electrical systems and related equipment)
  • Understanding the procedures and practices for preparation and installation of electrical equipment and wiring systems in buildings and structures
  • Understanding the practices, principles, and regulations for the connection and termination of cables, cords, and conductors in electrical systems
  • Understanding regulations, practices, and principles for inspecting, testing, commissioning, and certification of electrical equipment and systems in buildings and structures
  • Understanding principles of electrical systems with design, construction, installation, and maintenance
  • Understanding the regulations, practices, and principles of diagnosing and fixing faults in electrical equipment and systems in structures and buildings

All of these courses cover the knowledge you will need to become a qualified electrician. The courses during your apprenticeship will usually be done in either a day release format in which you work four days a week and attend classes one day a week, or a block release format in which you work for a few months and then attend classes for a few months until you have completed your course work. The type of program will depend on which format your employer prefers to work with.

Practical skills will be taught while you work on-site and must be documented by you in the form of a log. Your employer will also submit documentation attesting to your completion an acquisition of the necessary skills to complete the training. You shall learn:

  • How to apply Health and Safety regulations and practices (Installation and Maintenance)
  • Applying regulations of the work environment and practices of technology systems
  • How to organize and oversee the work environment (Installation)
  • How to plan, prepare, and install mandatory equipment and wiring systems in buildings and structures
  • How to inspect, test, commission, and certify electrical systems and equipment
  • Connection and termination of cables, cords, and conductors in electrical systems
  • How to diagnose and fix faults in electrical equipment and systems
  • Taking your Achievement Measurement 2 assessment examination.

If you want more information on electrician qualifications check out: http://electricianqualifications.info/part-p-qualification/ or http://www.tradeskills4u.co.uk/courses/part-p-domestic-installers-course

This is the basic guidelines for what you will be taught both in a classroom and on-site while you go through your apprenticeship toward becoming a fully qualified electrician. You will learn everything you need to know to achieve your NVQ diploma.